Point Turton on the Yorke Peninsula

January 16 to 18, 2009 – Point Turton

David, Jeannette, Robin, and Cathryn in Point Turton
David, Jeannette, Robin, and Cathryn in Point Turton

We’re back from one of Australia’s many perfect beach spots, Point Turton. The “shack” where we stayed belongs to Frank and Jane, friends of David and Jeannette, who very kindly included Robin and me in a weekend gathering of people who were part of a tennis club. Terry and Judy made up the fourth couple here for the weekend, and the bay-view home easily accommodated us all.

Frank and Jane, our incredible hosts at Point Turton
Frank and Jane, our incredible hosts at Point Turton
Terry and Judy
Terry and Judy

We arrived Friday afternoon and dined and wined our way through the first evening. Before we settled in for an Aussie barbecue, we went for a walk along the shore. Robin took photos of pelicans. I’d never been so close to one before.

Pelican on beach at Point Turton
Pelican on beach at Point Turton

Saturday everyone went out fishing. I opted to stay behind, needing a good walk and some time to stop, reflect, and write. My only companion was Cassie, a Rottweiler who was afraid of me. First time I’ve ever met such a timid Rottie.

Robin fishing for gar
Robin fishing for gar

Out in the Bay the twins were catching gar fish, one for David, two for Robin. Those were the only fish pulled in (though Judy caught five and Terry one more later in the day), but everyone was thrilled by the calm seas, pristine waters, and turquoise water – at least until one of the boats had to be pulled back to shore.

Robin was intrigued by the tractors lined up along the shore. The Yorke Peninsula is farming country so tractors are a convenient and sturdy vehicle for launching boats right into the salty water, no ramp needed. There is, of course, a ramp, down in the caravan park, for those unfortunate enough to be tractor-less.

Boat-launching tractors lined up on the beach
Boat-launching tractors lined up on the beach
Innes National Park
Innes National Park

After a late lunch back at the “shack”, the twins (Robin and David) and their partners (Jeannette and I) drove south to Innes National Park. On a glorious, calm day the native bush and blue seas offer stunning scenes around every curve.

Chinaman's Hat Island
Chinaman's Hat Island

At one stop, to look at Chinaman’s Hat Island, we saw a family of emus. Dad looks after the young in an emu family so the half-grown youngsters were being watched over by a large and very attentive parent. Not far away, along the track out to the lighthouse, we looked down to see emu tracks along the beach, possibly from the same family.

Emu siblings walking along road in Innes National Park
Emu siblings walking along road in Innes National Park
Emu dad guarding his young
Emu dad guarding his young
Emu tracks on the beach
Emu tracks on the beach
Surfers at Pondalowie Bay
Surfers at Pondalowie Bay

At Pondalowie Bay we walked out the boardwalk to watch the surfers. It’s Mark Jarman’s (Robin’s nephew) favourite surfing spot so we stayed for a while to watch young enthusiasts waiting for just the right waves. Rounding a bend as we returned to the car park, Jeannette spotted a pair of kangaroos and motioned to us to hurry to join her. We caught up with her just in time to see a female and her joey staring at a woman coming their way. Just after I took this photo, they hopped out of sight.

Kangaroos at Pondalowie Bay car park
Kangaroos at Pondalowie Bay car park
Aussie breakfast on the barbecue
Aussie breakfast on the barbecue
Wattle Point Wind Farm
Wattle Point Wind Farm

Our last morning in Port Turton, Frank cooked an Aussie breakfast on the barbie. After a leisurely start to the day, we drove to Wattle Point Wind Farm to see the 55 giant turbines that make up one of eight wind farms in South Australia.

Main street of Edithburgh
Main street of Edithburgh
Elevators and red cliffs at Ardrossan
Elevators and red cliffs at Ardrossan

Our route from there took us to Edithburgh, with its fine examples of colonial architecture. From there we meandered through a chain of small towns and into Ardrossan, where the beach is lined with red cliffs and bordered by an enormous barley elevator, where a conveyor loads ships bound for world markets. Some ships sail away with a load of barley, others with gypsum. Both use the same conveyor system for loading.

At Two Wells we stopped to see the house where a surprised mother of twins (no ultrasound in those days) brought two bundles home from hospital instead of one.

There was, of course, much more to our trip to the Yorke Peninsula, but if you’ve read this far, I’ve taxed your patience enough. I’ll just say that the flat, golden stubble of miles of farm fields, the old limestone farm houses tucked in among gum trees, the vast stretches of salt bush, the colonial architecture of rural towns, and the ever-present surrounding sea caught my imagination every minute of the way.

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3 thoughts on “Point Turton on the Yorke Peninsula

  1. Betty Brown

    Cathryn…you are such a prolific writer. My you’ve seen and done a lot! Wonderful photos….need to see more of you though! Baby Lily is a gem…
    Miss you, yet so very thrilled to see you enjoying & chronicling the epic journey. It seems to me you’re having the time of your life!!

    Big hug to you and Robin…

    Love David & Betty

  2. Fiona Macadie

    Dear Cathryn and Robin
    It is great to read all about your adventures. I log in every so often for an update on your movements and really enjoy your wonderful prose. It is so interesting to see Robin with his brother!
    My daughter and her husband left here on 12th January headed for Perth where they are staying with her brother-in-law and about to get some paid employment in the nursing business. They love being there and feel at home already. They are staying at Port Kennedy south of the city. If you are up that way let me know and I will give you her mobile phone number and maybe you can meet up for a coffee (subject to their work commitments).
    Was very interested to hear about your train journey – we quite fancy doing something like that when we get to Australia. Anyway we are so delighted that life is full of fun and adventure for you both.
    Lots of Love
    Fiona and Gordon

  3. Michelle

    Had to double take and then had a giggle at your first photo……looks like you’ve partner swopped for the day, judging on your jackets!!

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